Entries by Janet

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My Prostate Cancer Talk

I’ve had a lot of requests to print a talk I recently gave. Here it is. — Janet Recently, I took part in a large, two-day community cancer seminar in Prescott, Arizona, presented by Prescott United Methodist Church.   Many people have asked for copies of my talk, so here it is.  Readers of this blog […]

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Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer, Part 2

Checkpoint Inhibitors Miracle Drugs for Some, But Not Yet All Checkpoint inhibitors have one mission: to unleash the immune system.  They wake up the sleeping T cells, and in some people with cancer, they have done this spectacularly well. But right now, they don’t help more than a fraction of patients. In other words, for […]

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Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer, Part 1

You’ve got a lot of antibodies floating around in your blood – to every cold or virus you’ve ever had, plus all the antibodies your body has made after you got a shot to prevent the flu, measles, mumps, chicken pox, or tetanus, etc. If results of a clinical trial are as promising as scientists […]

Living in Prostate Limbo

Ask Rob Gray* to talk about how prostate cancer came into his life, and he has the best possible response: “I prefer to talk about how it came out of my life.” For nearly a decade, among other tests and procedures, Rob underwent 17 PSA tests, five PCA3 tests, and nine MRIs. He endured five […]

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Coffee and Prostate Cancer: Go Ahead, Have Another Cup

Here’s some news about coffee, the good, the bad – actually, there is no bad to this story. Coffee is good! If you can’t drink caffeinated coffee, decaf is good, too! Here’s why: Although most scientists are not yet willing to step out on a limb and proclaim definitively that drinking coffee prevents cancer (this […]

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PSMA-PET and Prostate Cancer

Remember these letters:  PSMA.  If you haven’t heard of PSMA-targeted agents yet, you probably will soon. Imagine a heat-seeking missile – except the tiny target locked onto by this particular missile is PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen), a protein that sits on the surface of prostate cancer cells.  The weapon itself is a small molecule, originally […]