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Healthy and Over 75? Keep Getting Screened for Prostate Cancer

We are living longer, and 75 is not the ripe old age it used to be.  But it’s a cutoff age for PSA screening – and this is missing cancer in men who really need to be treated, say Brady investigators.  “There is increasing evidence that this age-based approach is significantly flawed,” says Johns Hopkins urologist Patrick C. Walsh, M.D.  Walsh and I have written several books on prostate cancer, and this new information is being added to the upcoming 4th edition of our book, Dr. Patrick Walsh’s Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer, which we’re writing now.

 doctor medicineWalsh is the senior author of a recent Johns Hopkins study that looked at high-risk prostate cancer in older men.  The study’s interdisciplinary group of investigators also includes first authors Jeffrey Tosoian and  Ridwan Alam, and Carol Gergis; Amol Narang, Noura Radwan, Scott Robertson, Todd McNutt, Ashley Ross, Danny Song, Theodore Deweese, and Phuoc Tran.   

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against screening for men over 75.  “There’s no question that there has been overtreatment of prostate cancer,” says urologist Tosoian. “However, that is getting better; more men are taking part in active surveillance programs, and we are much better at interpreting PSA and other biomarkers to rule out aggressive disease.”

But PSA can’t be interpreted if a man doesn’t get his PSA tested.  Population studies have shown that “men diagnosed at 75 years or older account for 48 percent of metastatic cancers and 53 percent of prostate cancer deaths, despite representing only 26 percent of the overall population,” says Tran, clinical director of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences at Hopkins.  

Why are older men more likely to die from prostate cancer?  To find out, the team studied 274 men over age 75 who underwent radiation therapy for prostate cancer. “We found that men who underwent PSA testing were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer, and that men with either no PSA testing or incomplete testing (either a change in PSA was not followed up, or a biopsy was not performed when it was indicated); had more than a three-fold higher risk of having high-risk disease at diagnosis, when adjusted for other clinical risk factors,” says Tran.

Although this was a small study and more research is needed, Walsh says, “we believe that PSA screening should be considered in very healthy older men.”

©Janet Farrar Worthington

Regular disclaimer: This is a blog. It is not an encyclopedia article or a research paper published in a peer-reviewed journal. If a relevant publication is involved in the story, I mention it. Otherwise, don’t look for a lot of citations, especially if I’m quoting from a medical professional.

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Preventing Dementia: What You Need to Know

I’ve had a lot of requests to print a talk I recently gave. Here it is. — Janet

Recently, I took part in a large, two-day dementia seminar in Prescott, Arizona, presented by Prescott United Methodist Church for the community.  There was a full house both days; hundreds of people came, which shows that the need is great for all kinds of information about dementia. 

But with all the doctors, nurses, social workers, financial people, and other experts talking about caring for people with dementia, and caring for the caregivers, and the desperate needs for daycare, home care, and for respite care so that exhausted, stretched-to-their-limit caregivers can have a break, there was only one person who talked about preventing dementia.  I was it.  What’s wrong with this picture?

Why was I the only one?  Why aren’t very many doctors talking about this?  Why do so many patients and their families hear that there is nothing they can do?  I wasn’t there to paint an artificially rosy picture.  I know what it’s like to try to care for someone with dementia; I know what it costs, financially, physically, mentally, spiritually.  It’s happened to two people I love, and it’s heartbreaking. 

But I also know from my work as a science writer that dementia is not always inevitable, and new research has shown that even when someone has Alzheimer’s, changes in diet, sleep, and exercise may make symptoms better. 

Many people have asked for copies of my talk, so here it is.  Longtime readers of this blog will find some of this material familiar, but I’ve collected it all into one place.  I’m sharing it with you now because I want you to know that there really is hope.

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I’m going to start talking about the brain via an organ I know a little bit better: the prostate.  Bear with me.

Scientists have long known that, at autopsy, many men are found to have prostate cancer that never spread, never caused a problem, and never needed to be treated. They died with it, not of it. Sometimes, diseases only show up at autopsy. Men live a good long life and never show any signs of disease, and yet, when they die, there it is under the microscope.  But the disease never got out of hand. Men died with it, not of it

I did not know, until I interviewed Dr. Richard O’Brien, that the same thing happens with Alzheimer’s. O’Brien, who was Chairman of Neurology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, now Chairman of Neurology at Duke, told me that some people, at autopsy, have Alzheimer’s pathology. They have the telltale brain plaques and protein tangles seen in Alzheimer’s disease – but they never develop any cognitive impairment. Other people have the exact same pathology, and they die of heartbreaking dementia. Why is this?

O’Brien sees opposing forces at work in the brains of people as they age.

In Alzheimer’s, the tipping point – the game-changer, the key factor that weights the scales toward dementia – seems to be ischemic diseaseStroke, or mini-stroke. “With a given amount of Alzheimer’s disease pathology in the brain,” O’Brien told me, “there are two forces at work. One is driving you to become demented, and the other is protecting you from being demented. The biggest force that we’ve found thus far is cerebrovascular disease.”

This does not mean that everyone who has had a stroke or who has cerebrovascular disease is going to get Alzheimer’s. That’s not what he’s saying at all.

What it does suggest is that if someone has significant atherosclerosis, or has had a stroke, even if it’s asymptomatic – AND also has the plaques and tangles, that is a very powerful predictor that he or she will develop dementia.

The body has a limited capacity for insults. Stroke is an insult. Plaques are an insult. Think of a boxer who can take a lot of punches, but he can only withstand so much. The brain has a tipping point, too. O’Brien believes that “either one of these alone isn’t enough, but the two existing together in the same brain are enough to tip you over.”

Here’s some very good news:

Doctors are getting better at spotting and treating the risk factors that lead to stroke. Two recent studies found that the incidence of dementia has declined over the last 30 years. “The primary reason for that is the treatment of coexisting cardiovascular risk factors,” O’Brien says.

None of these treatments prevents the Alzheimer’s pathology from building up – but they “prevent it from becoming manifest. So you die with your plaques and tangles, but you’re still cognitively intact.”

So, what can you do to protect your brain?

One thing is Exercise. In a report published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, scientists followed about 20,000 people who took part in treadmill testing in the 1960s as part of a cardiovascular study. Today, these people are in their eighties, nineties, or are deceased. “The scientists found that the people who had been in the fittest 30 percent of that group had a dementia rate that was half that of the other people in the cohort… One of the side effects of regular exercise is a significant reduction in your risk of dementia.”

Another huge factor is cognitive reserve, and this is from education. It turns out that people who go to college tend to have more cognitive reserve than people who don’t.  If you didn’t go to college, don’t worry.  If you read and learn a lot, you are building up a cognitive reserve, too. Learning a language or playing a musical instrument, doing research for your work, or singing in a choir – basically, anything that challenges your brain, as opposed to sitting on the couch and staring passively at the TV – these have beneficial effects on your ability to think, on the brain’s ability to make neural connections.

Not being obese plays a similar role, too. Fat, especially belly fat, changes your levels of hormones. It also increases your risk of dying of cancer. Scientists are still figuring it out, but chances are good that obesity is not of great benefit to the brain.

“People with certain types of personality traits are less likely to get demented,” says O’Brien.  Wait, personality traits?

pexels-photo-156731People who are positive and upbeat seem to have some protection from dementia. Why? Well, it may be that people who are positive are more likely to educate themselves and exercise.  The good news is that positivity and resilience can be learned. You can actually become more positive by working on gratitude, being around more positive people, and being more connected to your family and community. 

Positive people may also be more likely to do crossword puzzles or sign onto Luminosity, although O’Brien doesn’t think doing a puzzle here or there is enough by itself; in other words, you probably can’t Luminosity yourself out of dementia.  Now, one study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that people who did crossword puzzles had a lower rate of dementia than did people who spent a lot of time watching TV. But O’Brien thinks the brains of people who choose to do crossword puzzles are different from those of people who like to watch TV. “If you forced the people who are watching TV all the time to do crossword puzzles, would they have a lower incidence of dementia? I doubt it.”

Cognitive reserve is a very robust thing, according to O’Brien. “If you look at the neurons of people with high levels of cognitive reserve, they’re pretty resistant to the toxic effects of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. They actually have bigger neurons in the key areas of the brain. Their neurons are more healthy, even if there’s a lot of Alzheimer’s disease pathology.”

And then there’s diet.

O’Brien suspects that the Mediterranean diet might have a significant effect on dementia, because it also has significant effects on cardiovascular health. “The data’s pretty clear that if you can prevent cerebrovascular disease, your chances of becoming demented are much lower.”

In 2014, scientists at UCLA published a priority research paper in the journal, Aging, that showed for the first time, memory loss being reversed.  It wasn’t because of a drug or procedure, but a comprehensive and personal approach that showed how Alzheimer’s is a complex disease, affected by diet, exercise, and even sleep.  All of these things contribute to the brain’s plasticity, said Dale Bredesen, the study’s principal investigator.  Ten people with memory loss, some with brain scan-confirmed patterns of Alzheimer’s, participated in a small study called MEND, for Metabolic Enhancement for NeuroDegeneration.

The participants made dramatic lifestyle changes.  They avoided simple carbs, gluten, and processed foods.  They ate more fish, did yoga, and meditated.  If they didn’t sleep well, they took melatonin.  They took vitamin B-12, vitamin D-3, and fish oil.  Within 6 months, 9 patients had a noticeable improvement in memory.  One patient, who was in the late stages of Alzheimer’s, did not show improvement, so there may be a point at which it’s too late.  But these findings suggest that at least early on, changing your metabolism can improve your cognitive function. 

Six of the people in the study who’d had to quit working were able to return to their jobs.  Some patients were followed up to two and a half years, and the memory improvements remained.  Larger studies are under way.

Let’s come back to exercise.

300_200_walk_gravelA study led by scientists from the University of Maryland School of Public Health, published in the Journal of Alzheimer‘s Disease, found that just 12 weeks of moderate exercise – basically, walking fast enough on a treadmill to get your heart rate up, but not so much that you couldn’t carry on a conversation with someone else while you did it – made a difference in how people’s brains functioned.

It made their brains work better; their neurons were more efficient. People could remember things more easily, and their brains didn’t have to work as hard to do it.

Scientist, J. Carson Smith, of the University of Maryland’s Neuroimaging Center, and said, “No study has shown that a drug can do what we showed is possible with exercise.”

The people in the study weren’t spring chickens, either. They ranged in age from 60 to 88. They weren’t athletes – far from it; they were considered “physically inactive older adults.” Some had already shown mild cognitive impairment. The people in both groups – those with the mild impairment and those with healthy brain function – improved their cardiovascular fitness by about 10 percent in the three months of the program.

They also improved their memory. MRI brain scans taken before and after the study showed “a significant improvement in 11 brain regions.” Even more exciting, the places in the brain that got better are the same ones that are affected in Alzheimer’s – the precuneus region, the temporal lobe, and the parahippocampal gyrus. Their word recall – remembering as many as possible out of a list of 15 words – improved.

What does this mean for you? It means that, whatever age you are, you can make your brain work better even with a small amount of effort. You don’t have to be in marathon-running shape. You don’t have to go grunt and sweat and dead-lift huge weights. Just walk for two and a half hours a week – 30 minutes a day, five days a week. If you don’t have 30 minutes, do it twice for 15 minutes. Any effort is going to pay off.

Other Things:

Prevent frailty. Frailty is your enemy.  But O’Brien says:  “I don’t think that falling apart when you get old is something that has to happen.”

Recently, Johns Hopkins geriatrician Jeremy Walston looked at what healthy older people have in common — at what they eat and don’t eat, and how they live – and came up with some practical tips. 

Nutrition:  Make Every Bite Count

If you do it right, just about everything you eat can help your body.  This doesn’t mean you have to eat just nuts and berries or be a food martyr who never eats comfort food.  What does it mean?

Eat Fresh Fruits and Veggies

grilled veggiesI know, duh.  Who doesn’t know that fresh fruits and vegetables are good for you?  But what’s in them matters, too. Walston says potassium is important, and “Fresh fruits and vegetables are rich in potassium.” 

When you get your blood pressure tested, it’s a fraction, one number over another.  That top number is systolic blood pressure, and potassium can lower it by several points.  It also helps regulate the heart rhythm.  If you are eating foods rich in potassium, this also means you’re not loading up on saturated fat, and this will help lower your cholesterol.

Get More Protein

As we get older, we need more protein.  “Protein helps muscles function better, and it is also important to help maintain muscle mass.” You don’t have to spend big bucks; you can get salmon in a can, or yogurt, or eggs, or an energy bar. Epic Bars are good sources of meat protein when you’re on the go.

Get Plenty of Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps keep your bones strong.  It also helps keep your muscles, heart, brain and immune system healthy, and can help prevent cancer.  Having low levels of Vitamin D is bad: A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that people with the lowest levels of Vitamin D had more then twice the risk of dying from heart disease as people with higher levels.  You can get it from sunlight, 20 minutes a day twice a week or so, or in a supplement.  The National Institutes of Health recommends 600 international units of Vitamin D a day if you’re under 70, and 800 IU a day if you’re over 70.

Get your shots

Lower your risk of getting the flu, or pneumonia, or shingles by getting a shot. Anything you can do to prevent being laid up is a good thing. 

Keep Moving

My husband, Mark Worthington, is a gastroenterologist, and he tells me that many of the older people he sees fall into two categories.  He always asks them what they do, and some will say, “We volunteer, we hike, we love to go out to dinner with our friends.”  Others basically do nothing.  All day.  Not good.  These people tend not to do as well.

Jeremy Walston says, “Stay active as long as possible.  Don’t sit for long periods of time, especially in the late afternoon or evening.  Studies show that those are low-activity times for many people, so it’s good to try to boost your activity during those times.”  Go for a walk after dinner.  Walking is good; in fact, you should walk a lot, or do some aerobic activity – there’s plenty to choose from. 

“It’s also important to do exercises that help you stay flexible, that help your balance and gait, and that help strengthen your muscles.  Don’t forget your shoulders,” which are important for maintaining core body strength and higher levels of function.  And if you have an “orthopedic issue,” like knee or hip trouble, address it, so you can keep moving as long as possible.”

However: 

Don’t Fall

Falling is bad.  The body literally takes a hit when you fall.  Many older people, who otherwise have been doing pretty well, take a turn for the worse after a fall.  Just being laid up for a few days can be difficult for the elderly because they tend to lose strength quickly.  The best way not to fall is to prevent it, says Walston.  “Things that can make you fall include: not watching your medication; vision problems; weakness in the lower extremities; and balance and gait problems.” 

One huge risk factor is easy to fix:  “low lighting and a cluttered living area.”  Make sure your rooms are well lit – that you not only have enough lights, but that the bulbs are high-powered enough so you can see where you’re going.  And go after the clutter.  It doesn’t take much – maybe a stack of books or magazines that slips over, a puzzle left by a grandchild on the floor, or pet toys – to make a walkway treacherous.  Sometimes, you’re so used to looking at clutter that you don’t see it.  This is why Walston recommends bringing in a friend or relative who is not used to your home, who can see potential trouble spots you haven’t noticed.

A personal note: When my aunt, who had dementia caused by a stroke, had to go to the nursing home, we asked what we could bring for her room.  They said:  Only one thing, because clutter makes demented people more agitated.  I figure, if demented people are the canary in the coal mine, and clutter stresses them out a lot, it most likely stresses us out, too, on a low level.  So not only can you trip on it, clutter agitates.

You can lower the odds of falling by working on your balance.  Tai Chi is a great way to do this, and so is yoga. 

What else?

“Cognitive risk factors include diabetes, elevated lipids, and high blood pressure,” says Walston.  Medications can keep all of these problems in check, which will help your blood vessels, which will help your brain.

Poor hearing:  If you don’t feel connected, you may tend to withdraw from the conversation, smiling politely, not engaging, because you don’t know what people are saying.  This is bad.  “Get a hearing aid if you need one.”  It won’t just help your hearing; it will help your brain.  There’s a feedback loop: When you stay connected, you are giving of yourself, talking and listening, and that stimulates your brain. When you don’t hear, you just sit there and don’t participate, you’re not getting that stimulation, and if you don’t use your brain as much as possible, you may lose function.

Depression:  If you are depressed, you are going to be withdrawn, you may not eat or sleep very well, and you may not get enough exercise.  Treating it is good “cognitive protection,” says Walston. 

Finally, Stay connected.  Talking to people — volunteering, driving, interacting with others in church, clubs, or other groups, being around family or friends – protects your brain.

©Janet Farrar Worthington

Regular disclaimer: This is a blog. It is not an encyclopedia article or a research paper published in a peer-reviewed journal. If a relevant publication is involved in the story, I mention it. Otherwise, don’t look for a lot of citations, especially if I’m quoting from a medical professional.

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Shape Up, Part 2

 It’s Really Hard to Lose Weight, and Now You’ve Just Depressed Me

I get it.  It is really hard to lose weight, and I would have depressed myself, too – except I know it can be done.  I am shaping up, myself, and I’m seeing results.  My kids got me to start going to the gym a few years ago.  Then I stopped doing weights and started running, but although I enjoyed it, I got plantar fasciitis and was hobbling around every morning when I got out of bed. 

Then my daughter sent me a link to this great website called Bodybuilding.com.  After doing just weights, and then switching to just cardio, I have finally figured out that it’s better to do both.  (I also want to state publicly that my daughter tried to tell me this, years ago, but I didn’t get it.  I do now.)

None of this is as hard as you might think.  Here’s the routine I have been doing:  http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/randy29.htm

I don’t even do all of it!  It starts with crunches.  I don’t do them.  I go to my local YMCA, and frankly, the floor is gross.  They have mats you can use, but they’re gross, too.  I don’t want to be on them.  This is not your fancy clientele, as evidenced by the sign over the water fountain telling people not to spit in it.  Sometimes people don’t read the sign, that’s all I’m going to say. 

There are 12 exercises, and before you think, “oh, Lord, how long will that take,” let me reassure you that each one just takes a few minutes.  And again – I don’t do them all!  It’s not that bad. 

barbellI start with the “barbell bench press.”  I do 40 pounds.  Don’t laugh; it used to be 30.  That’s okay.  If 40 gets easy, I will move up to 50.  Baby steps, people.  Then I do the dumbbell shoulder press.  I do 12 pounds each; again, you could laugh at the girly lack of weight, but it used to be 10 pounds.  One-arm dumbbell row, 25 pounds; it used to be 15.  Wide-grip lat pulldown:  I do 50 pounds.  It used to be 40.  Seated cable rows: I do 40 pounds.  That hasn’t changed, but I was doing it wrong at first, and now that I’m doing it right, that’s a good weight for me.  Barbell curl:  I don’t do it, but I do the dumbbell curls instead; 15 pounds, used to be 10.  Triceps pushdown:  I do 45 pounds.  I used to do 40.  Barbell full squat:  The pole that holds the barbells weighs 45 pounds; I add 50 to that.  Leg extensions: I do 50 pounds; used to do 30 when I started.  Lying leg curls: I do 50 pounds.  I don’t like them, so I often don’t do them.  And that’s okay, because I’m doing the other stuff.

treadmillThen I do 20 minutes on the treadmill; I used to run, now I walk briskly.  I also have a Chocolate Lab who is insane, and I take her for long walks, too.  Combining both the weights and the walking really has made a huge difference for me.    

I have also changed what I eat.  This has been difficult, because God help me, I love comfort food.  I grew up in the South, and when I go to South Carolina to visit my family, I gravitate to fried chicken, fried okra, fried catfish… notice a theme here?  Fried foods are very bad, as we talked about in a previous post.  Also, sweet tea is the house wine in the South.  I am drinking it straight, without the cup of sugar in each gallon.  My relatives are still speaking to me.

More concerning for me, is where my body likes to store fat.  I don’t have junk in the trunk, or thunder thighs.  Instead, my body wants to put on fat right in the tummy, where it causes the heart to work hardest.  It’s not much, but it’s more than I want.

I’m eating food that is better for me, and in return, I actually feel better for it.

You may find a diet that is perfect for you, and if that’s the case, more power to you.  I have found that slow and steady wins the race. 

Here’s my best tip: Every single little thing you do makes a tiny difference.  Have mustard instead of mayo.  If you get a sandwich, skip the cheese.  Get it on whole-grain bread. 

Don’t get chips with it.  If you say, “No way, I’m getting chips,” of course that is your right, and it’s your life.  How about maybe you get the small size instead of the “sharing size?”  At least there are fewer chips in there.  You’ve got to start somewhere.

Chicken has fewer calories than beef. 

Drink only water or something with no calories, like unsweetened tea.  Avoid soda like the plague.  Alcohol has a lot of calories.  You could start to lose weight right away if you just cut back on that.  Watch out for juice; it has a lot more calories than you think.  Eat a piece of fruit instead.  If you go to Starbucks, get a Refresher, which only has about 35 calories, instead of a Frappucino.  Don’t rely on diet drinks; that’s a whole ‘nother blog post, but they still make your body crave sweet things, and this does bad things to your insulin receptors. 

Make the effort to limit processed food.  Yes, when you’re tired and you just want to eat something fast, it’s a pain to cook from scratch.  I know this.  I have never been one to make a bunch of meals ahead of time, so I can’t recommend that approach, although a lot of people do it.  But it’s not that hard to get a piece of chicken and cook it.  You can buy frozen brown rice and microwave it; it takes three minutes.  Or cut up that chicken and stick it on top of a store-bought salad mix, then add a simple vinaigrette dressing.   

Fast food is bad.  Now, you may say, “But I have no choice, I’m on the road, I can’t carry food all the time.”  Keeping in mind that you actually could carry granola bars and fruit, I’ll say, “Okay, then watch your calories.”  McDonald’s posts the calories right on the sign.  If you just have to have a burger, limit your portion size, as the doctors say.  Get one of their original small hamburgers, not a cheeseburger.  Get a small fry instead of a large.  For God’s sake, don’t get a soda.  Your insulin receptors will thank you. It’s not great, and I wish you would do something else, but at least you will save hundreds of calories right there.  (I will note here that some nutritionists would say I’m being a traitor to the cause:  “Eek! Fast food burgers and fries are evil!  Shun them!  Get a salad instead.”  But a lot of people feel that when their doctor gives them a diet, it’s “my way or the highway,” and if they leave the highway once, they might as well just stay off-road.  I am hoping you will stay on the road for the long haul.)

Speaking of salads: Salads are good, but if you load them up with a creamy ranch dressing, lots of cheese and croutons, maybe some ham or bacon for good measure, with a big side of bread and butter, you are defeating your purpose.

Take the stairs. 

Don’t drive circles around the parking lot looking for that lazy spot right in front of the store.  Park farther away from the store and walk. 

When you start to exercise, don’t start with heavy weights.  Work up to it.  Don’t get on the treadmill, run fast and then poop out after two minutes.  Start by walking slowly.  In my opinion, it’s better to walk slowly for 20 minutes than speed-walk for five.  If you don’t have access to a treadmill, set a timer and walk for 20 minutes, at any speed you choose.  Anything you do is more than you would accomplish by just sitting still.  Trying means a lot.

Don’t get discouraged.  The worst thing you can do is try something, decide it’s too hard, then quit because you just know it’s never going to happen, and that you’re a loser, or whatever you might say to yourself.  You’re not a loser because you’re trying.  No judgment, only encouragement.  You are making the effort. 

Baby steps.

This lifestyle we have – I’m including myself here, because I’m fighting it, too – has got to change. 

We can do this.

©Janet Farrar Worthington

Regular disclaimer: This is a blog. It is not an encyclopedia article or a research paper published in a peer-reviewed journal. If a relevant publication is involved in the story, I mention it. Otherwise, don’t look for a lot of citations, especially if I’m quoting from a medical professional.

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Time to Shape Up

I am so happy.  I’ve been writing for the Prostate Cancer Foundation for several months now; everything I’m writing is for men with prostate cancer and their families.  It’s right up my alley – telling men what they need to know, what their doctors might not tell them or may not even know, and most of all, doing my best to be upbeat because there is so much hope out there for men at every stage of this disease.  When the PCF says the website is a “go,” I will be able to tell you more, and share all that with you.

But here’s a preview: One story has me so fired up that I just want to give you the highlights.  It turns out that prostate cancer is a disease of inflammation, just like diabetes.  You know what inflammation is – when you skin your knee, and it gets all red and hot around the wound.  That’s your body’s way of attacking the germs, and in the case of a skinned knee, it’s a good thing.

Unfortunately, the same process gets triggered on a much smaller scale within your cells.  A lot of things can cause inflammation within the cells, including fried foods and even sexually transmitted diseases. Those are topics for another post.   

Fat can trigger inflammation, too. It turns out that people who are overweight tend to have higher glucose levels, higher insulin levels, and to produce cytokines – immune system boosters, which can encourage inflammation; sometimes inflammation is good, if it helps you fight off infection, but other times, it can put added stress on the body and perhaps tip the balance toward cancer,

healthy foodThe good news is that it is never too late to change your lifestyle – and to have this change instantly lower your cancer risk.  If you lose weight and start to exercise early in life, you may delay or even stop some of the processes that lead to prostate cancer.  If you lose weight, and if you exercise after you are diagnosed with cancer, you will certainly be in better shape for treatment.  You will also help lower your risk of having the cancer come back.  If you are battling cancer right now, losing weight and exercising may help deprive the cancer of some of the things it needs to thrive.

This is not just happening in prostate cancer.  Yale scientist Melinda Irwin, Ph.D., M.P.H., presenting her research at the big yearly meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago, announced that she and colleagues found a “strong connection between exercise after (breast cancer) diagnosis and mortality.”  Even in women who had never really been active previously, starting regular exercise “seemed to show a great impact.” 

Irwin, an epidemiologist at the Yale School of Public Health, is probably not the favorite of the pharmaceutical industry; she has gone on record in the past pointing out that most large-scale drug trials don’t include a lifestyle component.  That’s because big Pharm “has no incentive to fund lifestyle behavioral interventions.  Why would they?  There’s no pill to take.”

And yet the connection between obesity and cancer keeps getting stronger.   ASCO, in a paper published in the online edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, has stated that being overweight “is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis.”  It also said that if you are overweight and are diagnosed with cancer, chemotherapy or other treatment might not work as well; you may have more complications from treatment, may be more likely to have cancer develop somewhere else, and you have a higher risk of dying from cancer. 

ASCO estimates that as many as 84,000 cancer diagnoses each year are due to obesity, and that being overweight or obese is the cause of as much as 20 percent of all cancer-related deaths.  The National Cancer Institute has linked being overweight to “poorer outcomes in cancer patients,” and to raising the risk cancers including breast, colon, prostate, kidney, pancreas, esophagus, and gallbladder.

In a different study, European scientists just showed that having “central obesity” – fat in the belly, around the heart – makes you more likely to develop more aggressive prostate cancer.   The EPIC (for European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study followed nearly 142,000 men from eight European countries for 14 years; the average age of the men when it began was 52.  Nearly 7,000 of those men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 934 of them died of it.  The scientists looked particularly at the men with the worst tumors.  They found there was a 14 percent greater risk of dying from prostate cancer for every 5-unit increase of Body Mass Index, and an 18 percent higher risk for every 10-centimeter (about four inches) increase in waist circumference. 

Having fat right around the waistline is already linked to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease; now, apparently, it is linked to cancer.  That’s because, unfortunately, fat in this particular location happens to surround organs, and it stresses them out.

walkingThe good news is, the risks go down as you shape up.  With every pound you lose, every bit of fat that you turn into muscle, your odds of being healthier go up.

Irwin has found that brisk walking lowered levels of two major biomarkers, insulin and “insulin-like growth factors” (IGF), in postmenopausal women who had survived breast cancer.  Both are linked to a higher risk of breast cancer.   She also has noted that breast cancer survivors who are obese have a 33 percent higher risk of having cancer return, or of dying from breast cancer, than other survivors do.

However, women who lost 6 percent of their weight through exercise and diet had a 30-percent decrease in levels of a protein associated with breast cancer, and women who exercised after being diagnosed with breast cancer had as much as a 40-percent lower risk of having the breast cancer return, and of dying.

To sum up, people who lose weight and exercise can improve their odds of not dying from cancer significantly. 

©Janet Farrar Worthington

Regular disclaimer: This is a blog. It is not an encyclopedia article or a research paper published in a peer-reviewed journal. If a relevant publication is involved in the story, I mention it. Otherwise, don’t look for a lot of citations, especially if I’m quoting from a medical professional.

How to Age Well, Part 2

This is the second part of a series on aging well. – Janet

It all makes sense, but sometimes we need to hear this stuff anyway.  Eat right, get vaccinated, and get some sun, because Vitamin D protects your body and helps prevent cancer.  This is from How to Age Well, Part 1.   Part 2 is about how we all need to get off the couch, mentally as well as physically.

Jeremy Walston, M.D., a gerontologist at Johns Hopkins, co-directs the Biology of Frailty Program and is co-principal investigator of the Older American Independence Center.  He has spent his career studying how we age.  In addition to many studies on specific aspects of aging, he has looked at what healthy older people have in common — at what they eat and don’t eat, and how they live – and has come up with some practical tips.  I recently interviewed Walston for Breakthrough, the magazine for the Johns Hopkins Center for Innovative Medicine.

Here’s more of what he had to say:

Keep Moving

exercise“Stay active as long as possible,” says Walston.  “Don’t sit for long periods of time, especially in the late afternoon or evening.  Studies show that those are low-activity times for many people, so it’s good to try to boost your activity during those times.”  Go for a walk after dinner.  Walking is good; in fact, you should walk a lot, or do some aerobic activity – there’s plenty to choose from. 

Just a few examples include taking a Zumba or Jazzercise class, riding a bike, swimming or doing water aerobics, hiking, jogging, or dancing.  In addition to getting cardiovascular exercise, “it’s also important to do exercises that help you stay flexible, that help your balance and gait, and that help strengthen your muscles.  Don’t forget your shoulders,” which are important for maintaining core body strength and higher levels of function.  And if you have an “orthopedic issue,” like knee or hip trouble, address it.  “It is essential to maintain your mobility as long as possible.”  This may mean that you need a knee or hip replacement – but it also could be something as simple as starting to use a cane.

However, while you’re staying active: 

Don’t Fall

balanceThe body literally takes a hit when you fall.  Many older people, who otherwise have been doing pretty well, take a turn for the worse after a fall.  Just being laid up for a few days, or even longer, can be difficult for the elderly because they tend to lose strength quickly. 

The best way not to fall is to be aware of the risk, and do your best to prevent it, says Walston.  “Things that can make you fall include not watching your medication; vision problems; weakness in the lower extremities; and balance and gait problems.” 

One huge risk factor is easy to fix:  “low lighting and a cluttered living area.”  Make sure your rooms are well lit – that you not only have enough lamps or ceiling lights, but that the bulbs are high-powered enough so you can see where you’re going.  And go after the clutter.  It doesn’t take much – maybe a stack of books or magazines that slips over, or a puzzle left by a grandchild on the floor – to make a walkway treacherous. 

Sometimes, you’re so used to looking at clutter that you don’t see it.  This is why Walston recommends bringing in an independent party – a friend or relative who is not used to your home, who can see potential trouble spots you haven’t noticed.

You can lower the odds of falling, as well, by working on your balance.  Tai Chi is a great way to do this, and many community centers offer classes (another bonus: taking a class helps you stay connected – see below).  Weights and exercises can also help your legs get stronger. 

Keep your mind active, too

puzzle“Cognitive risk factors include diabetes, elevated lipids, and high blood pressure,” says Walston.  Medications can keep all of these problems in check.  Even if you are currently being treated for these, it’s good to go the doctor for “tune-ups” every so often, to make sure you’re still on the right dosage.   

But other things can affect how well you’re thinking and functioning, too, and they may not be what you’d expect:

Poor hearing:  If you don’t feel connected, you may tend to withdraw from the conversation, smiling politely, not engaging, because you don’t know what people are saying.  This is bad.  “Get a hearing aid if you need one.”  It won’t just help your hearing; it will help your brain.

Personal note: I find this especially poignant.  There’s a feedback loop between our brain and the world.  We need stimulation to keep our brain going.  If we withdraw and isolate ourselves, we don’t get that feedback, and this hurts us mentally.  If all you need to do to help stop this from happening is get a dang hearing aid, swallow your pride and go get one!  Do it for your brain.

Physical inactivity:  Being active affects every part of your body.  It helps your heart work better, helps your lungs get more air, strengthens your muscles, and helps your brain work better.  Many studies have shown that older adults who are active are less likely to get dementia and Alzheimer’s. 

Depression:  If you are depressed, you are going to be withdrawn, you may not eat or sleep very well, and you may not get enough exercise.  All of these can affect your cognitive skills. 

Addressing all of these risk factors is good “cognitive protection,” says Walston.  And one of the most important ways to protect your brain is to stay active is to “interact with others more frequently.”  Stay connected.  Talking to people — volunteering, interacting with others in church, clubs, or other groups, being around family or friends – is good medicine. 

This is the second part of a series on ageing well. To read part one click here. {link}

©Janet Farrar Worthington

Regular disclaimer: This is a blog. It is not an encyclopedia article or a research paper published in a peer-reviewed journal. If a relevant publication is involved in the story, I mention it. Otherwise, don’t look for a lot of citations, especially if I’m quoting from a medical professional.

How to Age Well: Part 1

Quality of life is the key:  our goal shouldn’t be just to live to a ripe old age.  No one wants to be old and decrepit (or decrepit at any age, frankly).  But old and healthy – now that’s an exciting goal.

Jeremy Walston, M.D., a gerontologist at Johns Hopkins, co-directs the Biology of Frailty Program and is co-principal investigator of the Older American Independence Center.  He has spent his career studying how we age.  In addition to many studies on specific aspects of aging, he has looked at what healthy older people have in common — at what they eat and don’t eat, and how they live – and has come up with some practical tips.  I recently interviewed Walston for Breakthrough, the magazine for the Johns Hopkins Center for Innovative Medicine.

The secrets of healthy aging, he has found, aren’t so secret after all.  The best “fountain of youth” we have right now are some common-sense building blocks that can help everyone, at every age, live better.

Nutrition:  Make Every Bite Count

If you do it right, just about everything you eat can help your body.  This doesn’t mean you have to have an ascetic diet of nuts and berries, or be a food martyr who never eats birthday cake, macaroni and cheese, or a BLT with chips and a pickle.  But comfort foods and flat-out junk should be the exception, not the rule, and you should make most of your dietary choices good ones. 

Now, what does this mean?

Eat Fresh Fruits and Veggies

healthy food“Fresh fruits and vegetables are very important,” says Walston, “particularly ones that are rich in potassium.”  High-potassium fruits and veggies – including bananas, oranges, strawberries; dried fruits, like raisins, apricots, and prunes; spinach, tomatoes, avocados, beans and peas, and potatoes – are the best way for you to get potassium.  Potassium is also found in dairy products, in whole grains, meat, and fish.

Here’s some of what potassium-rich foods can do for you:  Blood pressure:  When you get your blood pressure tested, you’re told it’s one number over another one.  That number on the top is systolic blood pressure, and potassium can lower it by several points.  Heart: Potassium helps your heart beat, which happens about 100,000 times a day.  It can help regulate the heart rhythm, too.  Cholesterol:  Potassium, by itself, is not a designated cholesterol-lowering agent; however, if you are eating foods rich in potassium, this means you’re not loading up on saturated fat.  Just eating this good food instead of junk can lower your cholesterol.

Fresh fruits and vegetables are also are anti-inflammatory.  This is very important, because inflammation has been linked to many diseases, including several forms of cancer.  When you eat these healthy foods, don’t blow it, Walston adds:  “Don’t add salt and don’t overcook them.”

Get More Protein

Protein is increasingly important; we need it more now than we did when we were younger.  “Protein helps muscles function better, and it is also important to help maintain muscle mass.”  True, you can get protein from a cheesesteak sandwich, but it’s better to “choose high-quality protein that is low in fat,” says Walston.  Salmon, for example, is a great source of protein; so are chicken, lean beef and pork, eggs, beans, soy, and low-fat dairy products like yogurt.   “We need about 30 grams of protein at a sitting to stimulate muscle growth optimally,” and the best time to take in protein is after exercise; this helps the muscles recover and grow.  “You can also get it from a protein shake or energy bar.”

Get Plenty of Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps keep your bones strong.  It also helps keep your muscles, heart, brain and immune system healthy, and can help prevent cancer.  Having low levels of Vitamin D is bad: A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that people with the lowest levels of Vitamin D had more then twice the risk of dying from heart disease and other causes, compared to those with the highest levels.  The researchers listed “decreased outdoor activity” as one reason that people can become deficient in Vitamin D.  You can get it in milk, oily fish, mushrooms, eggs, and meat.  You can also take a supplement.  The National Institutes of Health recommends 600 IU (international units) of Vitamin D a day if you’re under 70, and 800 IU a day if you’re over 70.

sunshineAnd get some sun:  “Your body needs direct sunlight exposure to activate the vitamin D.”  A pretty amazing reaction happens when the sun hits your skin: the UV-B rays activates vitamin D into a form that your body can use best.  You don’t need to bask in the sun for hours; just a few minutes – 20 or so – a couple of times a week  is plenty of time to gain this benefit.

Get your shots

Lower your risk of getting the flu, or pneumonia, or shingles by getting a shot.  Many pharmacies, grocery stores, and big-box stores like Walmart and Target offer these shots at a low cost.  Take them up on it.  The risks of getting one of these illnesses far outweigh the inconvenience and minor expense of a vaccine.   

Coming up next:  Part 2:  Keep Moving, Don’t Fall, and Keep Your Mind Active.

©Janet Farrar Worthington

Regular disclaimer: This is a blog. It is not an encyclopedia article or a research paper published in a peer-reviewed journal. If a relevant publication is involved in the story, I mention it. Otherwise, don’t look for a lot of citations, especially if I’m quoting from a medical professional.